A Shiver of Sharks

“It’s Shark Week!” The radio voice awakened me with this news, which I thought was an awesome way to start the day.

This tooth is more than an inch long and still quite sharp. (K.Nollet 2015)
This tooth is more than an inch long and still quite sharp. (K.Nollet 2015)

Sharks thrill us with wonder, curiosity, and fear. Once you learn more about sharks, though, the fear usually turns to respect. That’s how I feel when I visit the beach in Venice, Florida.

Notice the different colors. (K.Nollet, 2015)
Notice the different colors. (K.Nollet, 2015)

Prehistoric sharks’ teeth wash up everywhere. One look at these shiny dark triangles and my mind starts organizing a math lesson. Or a science project. Or writing and art. You get the idea.

This summer, why not collect objects from the natural world to bring to your children? It doesn’t matter if they’re from your local park or someplace exotic. Display your finds at a child’s level, add a few books, and watch their curiosity grow.

 

 

N.B. Shiver refers to a group of sharks.

Ultramarine Utopia

There’s nothing like the blues of the ocean for clearing the head, lifting the spirit, and finding utopia.

The Merrimack River where it meets the Atlantic, as seen looking north from Plum Island toward Salisbury, MA  (K.Nollet, 2015)
The Merrimack River where it meets the Atlantic, as seen looking north from Plum Island toward Salisbury, MA (K.Nollet, 2015)

Every season at the beach has its unique beauty and tone.  One teacher colleague of mine believed this was essential science for children. She took her class on an annual field trip to her Maine beach house, to teach them about the ecology of the winter beach.

Spring beach trips in New England are chilly and unpredictable.  Last weekend I went to Plum Island in Newburyport, Massachusetts, and the infinite shades of ultramarine blues in the sea restored my creative spirit.